AIDSWatch 2017 to Give Congress a Serious Education on HIV Criminalization Laws

AIDSWatch 2017 to Give Congress a Serious Education on HIV Criminalization Laws

Elizabeth Taylor's granddaughter and great-grandson talk with Plus about AIDSWatch 2017 — and members of Congress ought to get ready.

Every year, AIDSWatch brings together hundreds of people living with HIV and their allies to meet with Members of Congress with the aim of educating them about important issues involving HIV-positive people in the country.

Presented by The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, it is the nation’s largest annual constituent-based national HIV advocacy event, and is implemented as a partnership between AIDS United, the Treatment Access Expansion Project, and the US People Living With HIV Caucus.

Outdated Laws Make Life Hell for People with HIV

Outdated Laws Make Life Hell for People with HIV

In 2008, Robert Suttle's life was calm. He was 29 years old and happy with his job as an assistant clerk at the Louisiana Circuit Court of Appeals. He had good friends and enjoyed his social life. One night, he went home from a bar with a guy named Joe*. According to Suttle, he told Joe that he was HIV-positive. Neither of them had a condom, so they waited until their next date to have sex. They slept together a few more times before Suttle ended the relationship. Shortly thereafter, he received a phone call that would wreck his life: Joe and their mutual friend were on the line together, accusing Suttle of sleeping with Joe without disclosing his HIV status. (To Suttle's knowledge, Joe's status remained negative.)

Tarell McCraney Explains the Inspiration Behind His Oscar Tux

Tarell McCraney Explains the Inspiration Behind His Oscar Tux

Tarell Alvin McCraney, who adapted his play "In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue" into the Oscar-winning film Moonlight. He accepted his Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay in an all-white tuxedo splashed with a red ribbon, to bring awareness to the ongoing fight against AIDS. And as he explained on Instagram, it has a far deeper meaning for him.

"My mother died of AIDS related complications when I was 22 years old," he wrote, and in the aftermath of her death he began to write the play that would become Moonlight. But his tuxedo choice was also inspired by actress and AIDS-activist Liz Taylor, who wore all white with a red ribbon in 1992. "I had the great honor of representing my mother and Mrs Taylor by wearing that same 25 year old Red Ribbon on my white suit to continue to bring awareness and solidarity to the fight against AIDS," wrote McCraney.

Elizabeth Taylor – Actress to Activist

Elizabeth Taylor – Actress to Activist

In honor of what would have been Elizabeth Taylor’s 85th birthday on February 27th, The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation released a short video today to celebrate her legacy. The video reflects on one of the most unforgettable figures of the big screen, diving into Elizabeth Taylor’s unique and multifaceted fame, and the path that led her to become one of the most powerful activists of all time.

What Elizabeth Taylor Can Teach Us About Activism

What Elizabeth Taylor Can Teach Us About Activism

On Feb. 27, Elizabeth Taylor would have turned 85. And even if you haven't seen any of her movies, Elizabeth's legacy is more relevant than ever. Elizabeth is known as an incredible activist, using her fame to put the AIDs crisis in the spotlight. Now, with the Trump administration threatening the rights of many different people, we can all learn something from Elizabeth's work. In a new video from the The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation narrated by Miley Cyrus points out exactly why we should all take a look back at Elizabeth's important work as we continue to fight for our rights today.

A Presidential Appeal

A Presidential Appeal

Re “Why Trump Should Keep Pepfar,” by Bill Frist (Op-Ed, Feb. 9):

Bill Frist is exactly right: The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or Pepfar, has been one of the most successful public health and peace initiatives in our country’s history. This lifesaving program is an important example of what our government can accomplish when we set aside partisan disagreements and focus on saving lives.

In the early 2000s, I was honored to lead the bipartisan effort, with the backing of the Congressional Black Caucus, to establish Pepfar. Under both President George W. Bush and President Barack Obama, we have strengthened the program. As a direct result of this bipartisan work, public health experts believe that we are on the cusp of realizing an AIDS-free generation by 2030.

HIV Bill in CA Could Decrease Stigma and Discrimination

HIV Bill in CA Could Decrease Stigma and Discrimination

It is widely unknown amongst the general population in the U.S. that we currently have antiquated and discriminatory laws that criminalize people living with HIV.

Two thirds of U.S. states, territories, and possessions have HIV-specific criminal statutes used to prosecute people with HIV. Most Americans would be shocked to learn that the only country that has prosecuted more people based on HIV status than the U.S. is Russia.

Barry Manilow, Desert AIDS Project honors Elizabeth Taylor

Barry Manilow, Desert AIDS Project honors Elizabeth Taylor

Desert AIDS Project’s biggest fundraiser of the year will honor Elizabeth Taylor posthumously for her trailblazing advocacy and care of people living with HIV and AIDS.

Presenting the Partners for Life Award on Saturday to Taylor’s grandchildren Tarquin and Naomi Wilding is her longtime friend Barry Manilow.

The Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards, in its 23rd year, is known as a star-studded evening of fun, fashion and philanthropy.

Lance Bass will serve as celebrity MC while Kirsten Vangsness of “Criminal Minds” assists with the live auction. Two auction items of interest include lunch and an exclusive tour of the Elizabeth Taylor archives in Beverly Hills, and an exclusive tour of photographer Herb Ritts' vault and archives and one of his limited edition prints.

Macy’s Fashion Pass Raises $1.1 million for  The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation

Macy’s Fashion Pass Raises $1.1 million for The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation

Member of REACH LA, a past recipient of ETAF funding from Macy’s Fashion Pass campaign, show their support for this year’s campaign over the summer. ETAF’s grant to REACH LA helped provide free HIV testing and counseling, linkages to medical care and treatment, and patient support services to African American gay youth and young adults who are at the highest risk for HIV/AIDS, or who are HIV-positive.