Steve Forbes on the Legacy of Elizabeth Taylor

Steve Forbes on the Legacy of Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor was an extraordinary philanthropist and humanitarian. Our family saw that firsthand back in the 1980s, when she and my father, Malcolm Forbes, became close friends. We got to know her and found her to be a witty, delightful, and thoughtful person, especially around my five young daughters.

Elizabeth was very concerned about the AIDS epidemic, which was then raging. Today it’s hard to fathom the prevailing attitudes about gay people and the disease that was mortally afflicting so many of them. “Didn’t they bring this on themselves?” was, tragically, a not uncommon response. Elizabeth would have none of it.

How Elizabeth Taylor’s Grandchildren Are Keeping Her Legacy Alive

How Elizabeth Taylor’s Grandchildren Are Keeping Her Legacy Alive

A violet-eyed vixen who starred in dozens of movies and took home Oscars for her performances in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf and Butterfield 8, Elizabeth Taylor was also a trailblazer, the first actress to be paid $1 million, for 1963’s Cleopatra. She was a business mogul whose fragrances have made more than $1.5 billion. She was a superstar whose every move (and marriage) was chronicled breathlessly for nearly seven decades.

But for Quinn Tivey, Taylor had a different role.

“I always just knew her as Grandma,” Tivey says. “She was the woman I could lie in bed with to chat and watch movies.”

To hear some of Taylor’s grandchildren (there are 10, and four great-grandchildren) tell it, what made the greatest impression about her wasn’t her prominence but her passion.

“We didn’t experience her as a movie star,” granddaughter Laela Wilding, a 45-year-old graphic designer, says. “She became impassioned about activism, and I can’t think of anything more inspiring than our grandmother’s compassion and determination for other people.”

AIDSWatch 2017

AIDSWatch 2017

More than 600 activist from across the country arrived in the nations capital for AIDSWatch 2017, held March 27 and 28. AIDSWatch brings people living with HIV and their advocates to the Capitol to meet with members of Congress and educate them on the issues affecting the HIV-positive population.

Elizabeth Taylor And Elton John Foundations Unite To Tackle HIV/AIDS In Southern States

Elizabeth Taylor And Elton John Foundations Unite To Tackle HIV/AIDS In Southern States

"She stood up for gay people when few others would," said Elton John of Taylor, "and she got right into the nitty-gritty of AIDS policy,"

Elton John and Elizabeth Taylor were friends and allies in the fight for LGBT equality and against HIV/AIDS. Six years after Taylor’s death, their legacy continues as the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) and the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) are partnering to address the HIV epidemic in the Southern United States.

Nine organizations in the region will receive a combined $485,000 in grants from the two organizations, continuing the work the two organizations have been doing for the better part of thirty years.

John Legend, Michael Bloomberg and Glenn Close Headline Town & Country Philanthropy Summit

John Legend, Michael Bloomberg and Glenn Close Headline Town & Country Philanthropy Summit

Town & Country is beginning its fourth annual Philanthropy Summit with a splashy list of speakers and five new sponsors.

The event, which will be held in Hearst Tower in New York on May 9, will tackle the issues of climate change, criminal justice reform, mental health, the global refugee crisis and philanthropy for arts. The summit, which is invite only, coincides with the release of the magazine’s June/July issue, which showcases 50 philanthropists. The issue, which goes on sale May 16, will feature Michael Bloomberg, John Legend and Cate Blanchett on three covers. In the issue, Bloomberg is interviewed by Yahoo’s Katie Couric, Legend is interviewed by U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.) and Blanchett is interviewed by David Miliband.

“It really represents what is happening in philanthropy right now,” Town & Country editor in chief Stellene Volandes said of the event and magazine. “All powerful philanthropy begins with a question: What can I do?”

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) and  the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) Announce New Grants in Partnership

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) and the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) Announce New Grants in Partnership

Nearly half a million dollars granted to organizations focusing on the AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States

NEW YORK (April 19, 2017) – The Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) today announced its third round of annual grants made in partnership with The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) to organizations fighting the AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States. With the increased support of $150,000 in funding from The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, EJAF has awarded $485,000 in grants to nine in the region. EJAF is excited about the continued impact this partnership will have in advancing the fight against HIV/AIDS in the Southern United States where it is needed most.

“A lack of access to HIV testing and quality healthcare continues to make the U.S. South an epicenter of the AIDS crisis in our country,” said EJAF Chairman David Furnish. “By making these grants, both Foundations are committing to continued advocacy and investment in the South – particularly with regard to LGBTQ individuals and Black Americans - until we see meaningful and lasting change in the course of this epidemic.”

Advocates Come to Washington for Largest AIDSWatch to Date

Advocates Come to Washington for Largest AIDSWatch to Date

650+ ADVOCATES GATHER IN WASHINGTON, D.C. TO MEET WITH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AROUND HIV FUNDING AND POLICIES, HIV CRIMINALIZATION REFORM, AND OTHER KEY ISSUES AT STAKE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IN THE UNITED STATES

March 29, 2017, Washington D.C. – AIDSWatch, the largest constituent-based HIV advocacy event in the U.S., concluded in Washington, D.C. yesterday. Presented by The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, the event brought over 650 advocates from 36 states to the nation’s capital to meet with members of the House and Senate to discuss the policies and resources needed to end the HIV epidemic, and protections for programs critical to the health and wellbeing of people living with and affected by HIV. Over 260 meetings with 80 members of Congress were held this year.

What Does Transgender Activist Chandi Moore Have in Common with Elizabeth Taylor?

What Does Transgender Activist Chandi Moore Have in Common with Elizabeth Taylor?

Chandi Moore, a transgender trailblazer who is active in HIV/AIDS awareness, is finding inspiration in one of Hollywood’s most legendary activists: Elizabeth Taylor.

“She was fearless — out there on the front lines and getting the job done to make things happen,” Moore tells PEOPLE of the late actress, who was one of the first stars to lend her celebrity to HIV/AIDS activism when she co-founded the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) in 1985 and The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in 1991.

HIV Activists Rally at Capitol: ‘Important Moment’ in History

HIV Activists Rally at Capitol: ‘Important Moment’ in History

WASHINGTON — More than 600 activists and allies from across the country gathered at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday to push for HIV funding from their congressional leadership and spread awareness of issues facing people with HIV and AIDS.

"This is an important moment in American history for all of us addressing health care. The HIV community will do everything it can to continue to lead the way to make sure that people have access to prevention, treatment and care,” said Jesse Milan Jr., president and CEO of AIDS United, a national non-profit organization that aims to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S.