All-Star HIV/AIDS Awareness PSA Set to Begin Airing Across the Nation this Month

All-Star HIV/AIDS Awareness PSA Set to Begin Airing Across the Nation this Month

Today, GLAAD is releasing the latest in its series of public service announcements (PSA) in partnership with The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF), set to begin airing this month in seventy-two cable markets across the nation through a generous contribution of airtime by Comcast NBCUniversal. The all-star PSA, produced by award-winning Martian Entertainment, was created to inspire, inform, and reignite the passion needed to beat the HIV and AIDS epidemic once and for all.

"GLAAD was founded in order to combat the sensationalized media coverage surrounding the HIV and AIDS crisis in the 80s, and we have been committed to this cause ever since," said Sarah Kate Ellis, GLAAD President & CEO. "This campaign will help bring more awareness to HIV and AIDS and remind everyone that we have the power to end this epidemic in our lifetime."

Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award 2016

Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award 2016

Elizabeth Taylor Human Rights Award presented on Nelson Mandela Day by Elizabeth Taylor's grandchildren and Charlize Theron. This years recipient was Martha Theolanah at the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa.

Elizabeth Taylor’s Grandchildren Support AIDS Conference

Elizabeth Taylor’s Grandchildren Support AIDS Conference

The darling of old Hollywood cinema, the late Dame Elizabeth Taylor, was brought to life when her grandchildren descended upon Durban for the 21st Aids Conference.

Laela Wilding, Finn Mcmurray, and Quinn and Rhys Tivey are ambassadors for the Elizabeth Taylor Aids Foundation (ETAF) at the conference. Images of Taylor are on display as part of a major photographic exhibition, presented by the Getty Images Gallery in London.

Taylor was an English-American actress, businesswoman and humanitarian. She was passionately committed to raising funds and awareness for HIV and Aids . The legendary actress co-founded amfAR, where she helped raise hundreds of millions of dollars for Aids research, and later ETAF, which focuses on direct care, prevention education, and advocacy.

The Grandchildren Of Elizabeth Taylor Are HIV Activists, Too

The Grandchildren Of Elizabeth Taylor Are HIV Activists, Too

Somewhere Elizabeth Taylor is grinning from ear to ear. Her grandchildren have not only become HIV activists in their own right, but they dove right into an HIV protest that took over the main stage at AIDS2016 in Durban, South Africa.

In his ongoing video blog coverage of the global event, Mark S. King speaks to the famous and newly minted activists about their belief that laws criminalizing people with HIV are wrong. Mark also profiles a gay lieutenant colonel who had his military service to our country “erased” after he was wrongly accused of not disclosing his status to a sex partner.

Elizabeth Taylor’s grandchildren visit Nkosi’s Haven

Elizabeth Taylor’s grandchildren visit Nkosi’s Haven

Three of Elizabeth Taylor's grandchildren and one of her great-grandchildren arrived in South Africa this week to visit Nkosi's Haven in Johannesburg.

The family were visiting as part of the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, and were treated to a day filled with excitement at the centre.

Jessica Nkosi's will to make a difference inspired by dad's death
The US movie legend's oldest granddaughter, Laela Wilding, led the group as they visited with children, had lunch and then attended a performance by artsINSIDEOUT at the Market Theatre in Newtown, Johannesburg.

HIV Positive Characters Still Absent on TV as Infection Rates Rise

HIV Positive Characters Still Absent on TV as Infection Rates Rise

A straight African-American woman finds out she’s contracted HIV from her ex-husband and has to navigate how it affects her personally as well as professionally, since she works as a physician’s assistant in a busy county hospital.

You won’t find this story on television today, but it was a prominent, ongoing storyline twenty years ago on the number one series on television during the 1996-97 season: NBC’s “ER.”

While characters with HIV and AIDS were becoming more common on television in the mid ’90s as the issue gained prominence on a global level, the story of Jeanie Boulet (played by Gloria Reuben) was particularly groundbreaking because she was not only a regular on a network television show, but a straight, minority woman and, most importantly, her character contracting HIV was not a death sentence, allowing audiences to learn from her story.

Get Tested. Know Your Status.

Get Tested. Know Your Status.

June 27th is National HIV Testing day; a day meant to remind people of the importance of getting tested for HIV regularly. Routine HIV testing protects you, and it protects others. For many of us who are living with HIV, National HIV Testing Day can be a reminder of first being diagnosed. It would make sense to think that because I’m such an advocate for starting medication as soon as possible after an HIV diagnosis, that I started medication right away. But the truth is, I didn’t. It took me nine months after diagnosis to feel comfortable enough to go on HIV meds.

When I was first diagnosed, I was extremely suspicious of the pharmaceutical companies and the medical field at large. I hated even just taking Advil for pain, let alone a cocktail of medication for an HIV infection. I believed that the medical and pharmaceutical industries were only operating in their best interest. Their goal is to keep us (the public) just sick enough to keep needing their products and just well enough to continue working a job to pay for them or be insured enough to have them paid for, I thought.

The Doctor Who First Saw AIDS Believes in a ‘Possible Cure’

The Doctor Who First Saw AIDS Believes in a ‘Possible Cure’

Thirty-five years ago this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a report on five cases of a mysterious lung infection in previously healthy gay men in Los Angeles. No one could imagine the devastating loss of human life that would follow that first article.

The doctor who took care of the patients and wrote the report was Dr. Michael Gottlieb, an immunologist at UCLA. Right after his article was published, physicians from New York, San Francisco and other cities across the country began reporting patients suffering and dying with similar symptoms.

The cause was a mystery for the medical community. It took two more years after Gottlieb's report before scientists discovered the men suffered from AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), caused by a new virus the medical community called HIV.

With Gottlieb's initial case report, the era of the AIDS epidemic had officially begun.

A Young Woman Talks Life with HIV

A Young Woman Talks Life with HIV

While growing up in a suburban Jewish home in Granada Hills, Kelly Gluckman never thought she could become HIV positive.

“I knew that AIDS was a huge problem in Africa, in the gay community and among drug abusers, but it was something that happened to ‘them’ over there,” Gluckman, 29, said during an interview at the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (elizabethtayloraidsfoundation.org) in Beverly Hills, where she is now an activist who speaks to young people about HIV and AIDS.