John Legend, Michael Bloomberg and Glenn Close Headline Town & Country Philanthropy Summit

John Legend, Michael Bloomberg and Glenn Close Headline Town & Country Philanthropy Summit

Town & Country is beginning its fourth annual Philanthropy Summit with a splashy list of speakers and five new sponsors.

The event, which will be held in Hearst Tower in New York on May 9, will tackle the issues of climate change, criminal justice reform, mental health, the global refugee crisis and philanthropy for arts. The summit, which is invite only, coincides with the release of the magazine’s June/July issue, which showcases 50 philanthropists. The issue, which goes on sale May 16, will feature Michael Bloomberg, John Legend and Cate Blanchett on three covers. In the issue, Bloomberg is interviewed by Yahoo’s Katie Couric, Legend is interviewed by U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.) and Blanchett is interviewed by David Miliband.

“It really represents what is happening in philanthropy right now,” Town & Country editor in chief Stellene Volandes said of the event and magazine. “All powerful philanthropy begins with a question: What can I do?”

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) and  the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) Announce New Grants in Partnership

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) and the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) Announce New Grants in Partnership

Nearly half a million dollars granted to organizations focusing on the AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States

NEW YORK (April 19, 2017) – The Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) today announced its third round of annual grants made in partnership with The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) to organizations fighting the AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States. With the increased support of $150,000 in funding from The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, EJAF has awarded $485,000 in grants to nine in the region. EJAF is excited about the continued impact this partnership will have in advancing the fight against HIV/AIDS in the Southern United States where it is needed most.

“A lack of access to HIV testing and quality healthcare continues to make the U.S. South an epicenter of the AIDS crisis in our country,” said EJAF Chairman David Furnish. “By making these grants, both Foundations are committing to continued advocacy and investment in the South – particularly with regard to LGBTQ individuals and Black Americans - until we see meaningful and lasting change in the course of this epidemic.”

Advocates Come to Washington for Largest AIDSWatch to Date

Advocates Come to Washington for Largest AIDSWatch to Date

650+ ADVOCATES GATHER IN WASHINGTON, D.C. TO MEET WITH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AROUND HIV FUNDING AND POLICIES, HIV CRIMINALIZATION REFORM, AND OTHER KEY ISSUES AT STAKE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV IN THE UNITED STATES

March 29, 2017, Washington D.C. – AIDSWatch, the largest constituent-based HIV advocacy event in the U.S., concluded in Washington, D.C. yesterday. Presented by The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, the event brought over 650 advocates from 36 states to the nation’s capital to meet with members of the House and Senate to discuss the policies and resources needed to end the HIV epidemic, and protections for programs critical to the health and wellbeing of people living with and affected by HIV. Over 260 meetings with 80 members of Congress were held this year.

What Does Transgender Activist Chandi Moore Have in Common with Elizabeth Taylor?

What Does Transgender Activist Chandi Moore Have in Common with Elizabeth Taylor?

Chandi Moore, a transgender trailblazer who is active in HIV/AIDS awareness, is finding inspiration in one of Hollywood’s most legendary activists: Elizabeth Taylor.

“She was fearless — out there on the front lines and getting the job done to make things happen,” Moore tells PEOPLE of the late actress, who was one of the first stars to lend her celebrity to HIV/AIDS activism when she co-founded the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) in 1985 and The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in 1991.

HIV Activists Rally at Capitol: ‘Important Moment’ in History

HIV Activists Rally at Capitol: ‘Important Moment’ in History

WASHINGTON — More than 600 activists and allies from across the country gathered at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday to push for HIV funding from their congressional leadership and spread awareness of issues facing people with HIV and AIDS.

"This is an important moment in American history for all of us addressing health care. The HIV community will do everything it can to continue to lead the way to make sure that people have access to prevention, treatment and care,” said Jesse Milan Jr., president and CEO of AIDS United, a national non-profit organization that aims to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S.

AIDSWatch 2017 to Give Congress a Serious Education on HIV Criminalization Laws

AIDSWatch 2017 to Give Congress a Serious Education on HIV Criminalization Laws

Elizabeth Taylor's granddaughter and great-grandson talk with Plus about AIDSWatch 2017 — and members of Congress ought to get ready.

Every year, AIDSWatch brings together hundreds of people living with HIV and their allies to meet with Members of Congress with the aim of educating them about important issues involving HIV-positive people in the country.

Presented by The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, it is the nation’s largest annual constituent-based national HIV advocacy event, and is implemented as a partnership between AIDS United, the Treatment Access Expansion Project, and the US People Living With HIV Caucus.

Outdated Laws Make Life Hell for People with HIV

Outdated Laws Make Life Hell for People with HIV

In 2008, Robert Suttle's life was calm. He was 29 years old and happy with his job as an assistant clerk at the Louisiana Circuit Court of Appeals. He had good friends and enjoyed his social life. One night, he went home from a bar with a guy named Joe*. According to Suttle, he told Joe that he was HIV-positive. Neither of them had a condom, so they waited until their next date to have sex. They slept together a few more times before Suttle ended the relationship. Shortly thereafter, he received a phone call that would wreck his life: Joe and their mutual friend were on the line together, accusing Suttle of sleeping with Joe without disclosing his HIV status. (To Suttle's knowledge, Joe's status remained negative.)

Tarell McCraney Explains the Inspiration Behind His Oscar Tux

Tarell McCraney Explains the Inspiration Behind His Oscar Tux

Tarell Alvin McCraney, who adapted his play "In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue" into the Oscar-winning film Moonlight. He accepted his Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay in an all-white tuxedo splashed with a red ribbon, to bring awareness to the ongoing fight against AIDS. And as he explained on Instagram, it has a far deeper meaning for him.

"My mother died of AIDS related complications when I was 22 years old," he wrote, and in the aftermath of her death he began to write the play that would become Moonlight. But his tuxedo choice was also inspired by actress and AIDS-activist Liz Taylor, who wore all white with a red ribbon in 1992. "I had the great honor of representing my mother and Mrs Taylor by wearing that same 25 year old Red Ribbon on my white suit to continue to bring awareness and solidarity to the fight against AIDS," wrote McCraney.