By Lorelei Marfil
August 21, 2015

GETTY’S GLAM GIRL: Getty Images Gallery will mount a retrospective on Elizabeth Taylor and her fight to stamp out HIV and AIDS. Staged in connection with the Elizabeth Taylor Trust and The Elizabeth Taylor Aids Foundation, “Grit and Glamour” is to commemorate Taylor’s 30-year involvement in raising awareness about the illness. “Grit and Glamour” will feature 50 photographs ranging from studio portraits and contact sheets to backstage images, behind-the-scenes imagery and unpublished photos of Taylor’s career and philanthropic work.

“The aim of the exhibition was to celebrate Ms. Taylor’s courageous work in raising awareness of HIV/AIDS when it was hardly spoken about, and the title reflects this,” said Getty Images Gallery curator Susanna Harrison. “We wanted the images to reflect her incredible spirit and determination, whilst at the same time showcasing her legendary beauty and rise to become one of Hollywood’s best-loved actresses. Images range from her days as a teenage star and attending her first gala events right up to establishing her AIDS foundation. They show her as a wife, mother and actress with both candid shots and classic portraits,” she told WWD.

The show is to run from Oct. 9 to Nov. 7 at Getty Images Gallery in London. It will then move to various cities, including New York, Los Angeles, South Africa and France.  The images are available for purchase, although Getty Images Gallery did not disclose the prices. A percentage of the proceeds from each sale are to benefit The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation.

“It has been very special for me to look through these photographs spanning decades of my mother’s life,” said Christopher Wilding, Taylor’s son. “They remind me how special and unique it was growing up around her; life often took on the magical atmosphere of the traveling circus. But mom never ‘played’ the celebrity; she lived life on her own terms and was always true to herself. She had a keen sense of fairness, and she always sided with the underdog. She stood up for what she believed in.”

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